Stewed Yellow Squash and Tomatoes

Stewed Yellow Squash and Tomatoes

This dish just screams, “summer!!” And it’s perfect for those summer months when you are overrun with squash.

You can make this with zucchini instead of yellow squash or with a combination of both. You can also use fresh tomatoes instead of canned, but you may need to add a little bit of water to the skillet with them.

Stewed Squash and Tomatoes

Stewed Yellow Squash and Tomatoes

1/4 cup olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
4 medium yellow squash, cut into bite-size chunks
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 14.5 ounce can diced tomatoes, with juices
salt and pepper, to taste

Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion, and cook, stirring often, until softened, about 10 minutes. Add the squash and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the squash is just tender (but not mushy), about 10 minutes. Add the minced garlic and cook one minute longer. Next, add the diced tomatoes and their juices. Lower the heat slightly and continue to cook, stirring often, until most of the liquid has cooked out and the squash has reached the desired tenderness, approximately 5 minutes. Season to taste with more salt and pepper.


Collard Greens Slaw (2 Ways)

Collard Greens Slaw 2 Ways

Last week when I posted the Pickled Collard Greens recipe on my Facebook page, a friend of mine commented that she liked Collard Greens Slaw. I thought the idea of making slaw with collards was interesting, but didn’t get any details from her.

Today, I decided to try making slaw with collards. I had a couple of bunches of collard greens from my CSA in the fridge that I need to use. For the sake of experimentation,  I made two different dressings, my basic coleslaw dressing and the dressing that I used on my Broccoli Salad. I mixed up a bowl of collards, red cabbage, carrot, and green onions. The combination of the green, purple, and orange colors is so beautiful! I divided the mixed veggies and dressed 1/2 with one dressing and half with the other dressing. Honestly, both resulting slaws were good. My husband preferred the vinegar-based slaw and I slightly favored the mayo-based slaw. I thought the slaws were best eaten the day they were made.

Collard Greens Slaw (2 Ways)

1/2 bunch collard greens, washed, dried, center rib removed, thinly sliced
1/4 head red cabbage, cored and thinly sliced
1 large carrot, shredded
2 green onions, thinly sliced
dressing of your choice, recipes below

Combine the collards, red cabbage, carrot, and green onions in a large bowl. Add the dressing, tossing well to coat the veggies. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Creamy Collard Greens Slaw

Mayonnaise-Based Dressing

1/4 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/2 tablespoon vinegar
salt and pepper, to taste

Combine the ingredients in a small bowl.

Vinegar Based Collard Greens Slaw

Vinegar-Based Dressing

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon sugar
4 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1 tablespoon canola oil
salt and pepper, to taste

Combine the ingredients in a small bowl.


Pickled Collard Greens

Pickled Collard Greens

I get the most amazing collard greens from my CSA. Sometimes I get an overwhelming amount of amazing collard greens from my CSA. It’s a challenge I gladly accept. I’m always trying to think of interesting ways to prepare them. This morning I put a Boston Butt pork roast in the crockpot with dinner plans for pulled pork sandwiches on homemade Focaccia bread. I was staring into the fridge and the idea of pickling the collards popped into my head. I have pickled mustard greens before and enjoyed using them as a condiment. Why not collards? Y’all, they turned out so good. They were excellent on the pulled pork sandwiches. I kind of wish I had made a double batch.

These sweet and sour collard greens would also make an excellent side dish. Just cook the collards until tender (about 20 minutes longer than stated in the recipe) and serve warm. I could easily drink the pickling/cooking liquid. : )

Pickled Collard Greens

1 large bunch of collard greens
2 cups water
1/2 cup vinegar
1/2 cup sugar
1 teaspoons kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Wash and chop the collard greens. I usually remove the center ribs from the leaves before chopping.

In a pot over high heat, bring the water, vinegar, sugar, salt, and pepper to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and let simmer for 5 minutes.

Add the chopped collards and cook for 5 (for crunchy collards – these are actually better after a few days in the fridge) to 20 (for use right away as a condiment or side dish) minutes. Let the collards and pickling liquid cool and then transfer to a large Mason jar. Refrigerate at least several hours (a couple of days is even better) before use.


Wilted Bok Choy and Tatsoi

Wilted Bok Choy and Tatsoi

I got my first CSA box of the season on Wednesday. Yay! I love being a CSA member! Historic flooding in South Carolina devastated the farm in October, but they are rebounding and expect a plentiful spring season. They are off to a strong start. This week’s box included bok choy, tatsoi, spring lettuce mix, strawberries, spring onions, and mustard greens. I love the challenge of coming up with new ways to cook the produce from the CSA box.

This morning I threw this recipe together to go with my over-easy eggs. It’s a great side dish. I can imagine it would be an excellent side for Teriyaki (or Sweet Bourbon) Salmon.

If you are not lucky enough to get fresh bok choy and tatsoi from your CSA, this produce can usually be found in Asian Markets.

The recipe is written for one. Double, triple, quadruple, etc… it as needed. If you like your greens with a little acid, add a dash of rice vinegar along with the soy sauce.

Wilted Bok Choy and Tatsoi
per person

1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 clove garlic, minced
1 small head of bok choy, stalk end trimmed, roughly chopped
2 cups of tatsoi, roughly chopped
1 teaspoon soy sauce
salt and pepper
sesame seeds

Heat the sesame oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for a minute. Add the chopped bok choy and sauté another minute before adding the tatsoi. Season with the soy sauce and black pepper. Cook until wilted, just a few minutes. Taste and season with salt, if needed. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and serve.


Lentil Hummus

Lentil Hummus

Lentils are a great protein source. They are inexpensive and can be prepared in a variety of ways. Their creamy texture makes them an excellent alternative to chickpeas when making hummus.

There are many different types of lentils, so you can use your favorite for this recipe. I almost always have brown lentils on hand, so that is what I use. Red lentils would be perfect too.

Lentil hummus is great as a dip with pita bread or chips and/or fresh veggies. It is also wonderful as a spread for veggie wraps or sandwiches. I like it on a flour tortilla with lettuce, tomato, cucumber, and black olives.

Lentil Hummus

1 cup dried lentils (your favorite kind), picked over and rinsed
at least 2 cups water
salt
1 clove garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons tahini
2 tablespoons olive oil
juice of 1 lemon
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper (optional)

Cook lentils (according to package directions) in the water until they are very tender, almost mushy. The cooking times will vary depending on the type of lentil you are using. The brown lentils I used took about 35 minutes. You may need to add water to the lentils as they cook. Keep an eye of them. Towards the end of cooking, season the lentils to taste with salt. Once done, take the lentils off the heat and drain off excess cooking liquid. Let the lentils cool.

In a food processor, blend the cooked lentils, garlic, tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, cumin, and cayenne until very smooth. You may need to add a little water, about 1 tablespoon at time, to help blend the mixture. I let the food processor run for several (4 – 5) minutes, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl and check the consistency of the lentil hummus. Blend in the desired amount of salt. Taste the hummus and adjust the seasonings, if necessary.


Coca-Cola Ham

Coca-Cola Ham sm

Coca-Cola Ham is a Southern thing. The sweetness of the Coke pairs so well with the salty pork. It’s no wonder that generations of cooks have been preparing their holiday hams this way.

Don’t worry about measurements when making this recipe, just use your best judgement. It’s pretty hard to mess this up.

I usually serve the ham with some the Coca-Cola cooking liquid from the bottom of the pan. I also store any leftover ham in it.

Coca-Cola Ham

fully-cooked ham of your choice (I usually use a semi-boneless ham)
Dijon or brown mustard
brown sugar
Coca-Cola

Preheat the oven to 350º F.

Trim excess fat off the ham and then score it in a diamond pattern. At this point, I place the ham in the baking dish.

Rub a layer of Dijon (or brown) mustard all over the ham. The amount will vary depending on the size of the ham. For a 6-pound ham, I used about 4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) of the mustard.

Ham with Mustard

Next, pack a layer of the brown sugar on top of the mustard-covered ham. I usually use twice as much brown sugar as mustard (but you can use more or less). Again, the amount will vary. For a 6-pound ham, I used 1/2 cup of brown sugar. Pour 1 to 1 1/2 cups of Coca-Cola in the bottom of the pan (not over the top of the ham).

Ham

Bake the ham for about 20 minutes per pound (That’s 2 hours for a 6-pound precooked ham). After the ham has been cooking for an hour, start basting it with the Coca-Cola/ham juices from the bottom of the pan every 20 minutes until done. For safety, use a meat thermometer to check to see if the ham is ready. You want the internal temperature of the ham to be about 145º F. Let the ham stand 15 minutes before slicing.


Asparagus with Balsamic Butter Sauce

Asparagus with Balsamic Butter Sauce

Are you a fan of Allrecipes? I am! I have found some pretty fantastic recipes on the site, including this one for Asparagus with Balsamic Butter Sauce. It makes for a nice, flavorful side dish. A perfect addition to your Easter (or any) meal.

Find the recipe here.

Asparagus with Balsamic Butter Sauce 2


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