Cream of Cabbage and Potato Soup

Cream of Cabbage and Potato Soup

Cabbage. So much cabbage. I have gotten 4 or 5 heads of green cabbage in my CSA boxes this season. I’ve been struggling to come of with new ways of using it. I have fallen back on old favorites like stir fries, Fried Cabbage, vegetable soups, Southeast Asian Cabbage Salad, Vegetarian Hot and Sour Soup, and Coleslaw. I also made Stuffed Cabbage Rolls (which I will blog later). And, I made this soup.

I was really happy with how the soup turned out. It was delicious! It reminded me of my Cream of Cauliflower and Potato Soup. That is a good thing.

I sprinkled a little shredded cheddar cheese over my first bowl of soup. It’s a wonderful compliment to the flavors of the cabbage and potatoes. The soup is also wonderful without cheese.

Cream of Cabbage and Potato Soup with Cheese

Cream of Cabbage and Potato Soup

3 tablespoon butter
1 large onion, chopped
1/2 head green cabbage, cored and shredded
1 carrot, peeled and diced
3 large potatoes (or 6 smallish), peeled and diced
7 cup vegetable broth (or chicken broth)
1 cup half & half or cream
salt and pepper, to taste

cheese (cheddar, Swiss, Edam, etc…), shredded (optional)

In a soup pot, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onions and cabbage and cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Add the diced carrot, diced potatoes, and vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes. Add the half & half and season with salt and pepper. Serve. Sprinkle with shredded cheese of your choice, if you desire.

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Red Cabbage Salad with Bleu Cheese and Candied Pecans

Red Cabbage Salad

This is my adaptation of a recipe I found in the March/April 2014 issue of Eating Well magazine. I love all the different textures and flavors of this salad. It’s delicious when first made, but even better the next day, when the flavors have had time to meld.

I’m not a huge fan of bleu cheese, but I picked up a particularly mild one at Aldi and have enjoyed it. Lately it seems as if I am going out of my way to include more cheese in my diet. I think I’m trying to make up for the time I lost during my 16 day low iodine diet (I couldn’t have dairy) to prepare for my nuclear whole body scan. By the way, my scan results came back with “no abnormal distribution” !! This is a really, really good thing. I’m meeting with my oncologist at the end of May and I’m hoping that she will finally consider me to be cancer free. Meanwhile, I’m feeling pretty good and am getting on with life.

Red Cabbage Salad with Bleu Cheese and Candied Pecans

1/2 head red cabbage, cored and thinly sliced
2 green onions, thinly sliced
1/4 cup dried cranberries
crumbled bleu cheese

For the candied pecans:
1/2 cup pecan halves
2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons sugar (you may use maple syrup or brown sugar instead)
pinch salt

For the dressing:
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

For the candied pecans:
Add the pecans, butter, sugar, and pinch of salt to a skillet over medium heat. Cook, stirring to coat the pecans, until the sugar has caramelized (about 5 to 7 minutes). Pour out onto a piece of foil or wax paper and let cool. Break up the nuts.

For the dressing:
Combine the olive oil, red wine vinegar, Dino  mustard, and salt and black pepper in a Mason jar with a lid. Secure the lid on the jar and shake to combine ingredients.

For the salad:
Combine the red cabbage, green onions, and dried cranberries in a large bowl. Add enough dressing to coat the cabbage (you may not use all that you have prepared) and toss well. Serve topped with the bleu cheese and candied pecans.

 


Kohlrabi and Radish Slaw

Kohlrabi and Radish Slaw

I’ve made this recipe two days in a row with kohlrabi and radishes from my CSA. It’s downright addicting. It’s a simple and delicious slaw has the perfect amount of crunch and sweetness. There is no added fat and 1/4 of the recipe comes in at about 66 calories.

Kohlrabi and Radish Slaw

Makes about 4 servings

1/4 head green cabbage, cored and thinly sliced
2 bulbs kohlrabi, leaves removed, ends trimmed, peeled, and julienned
6 radishes, ends trimmed, julienned
1 clove garlic, minced
2 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
1 tablespoon fish sauce

Combine the cabbage, kohlrabi, and radishes in a large bowl. In a smaller bowl, combine garlic, sugar, rice vinegar, and fish sauce. Stir until the sugar is dissolved. Pour the dressing over the slaw and toss well.

Kohlrabi and Radish Slaw 2


Fried Cabbage

Fried Cabbage

This is a simple and inexpensive side dish made with cabbage. Cooking the cabbage this way really brings out the sweetness. This recipe is versatile too. I don’t always include the onion when I “fry” cabbage and sometimes I even sprinkle a little bit of bread crumbs into the dish just before I take it off the heat. Sometimes I toss in a pinch of caraway seeds. In the South, Fried Cabbage is often made with bacon and bacon grease. So, if you are a bacon fan, you can fry a few strips of bacon, reserve the cooked bacon, and use the bacon grease to fry the cabbage in instead of butter. Crumble the bacon and add back to the cabbage just before serving.

Fried Cabbage

1 small head green cabbage, cored and shredded
1/2 onion, diced
3 tablespoons butter (or favorite oil)
garlic powder
salt and pepper

Melt the butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté for a couple of minutes. Add the shredded cabbage and season to taste with garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Cook, stirring often, until the cabbage is tender. I like to take it a little further to the point where the cabbage is starting to brown and caramelize.


Coleslaw

Coleslaw

I love cabbage. It can be used in so many different dishes. In the United States, especially the southern US, coleslaw is a very common dish made with cabbage. There are a gabillion different ways to prepare it, but I like a basic slaw. If you shred your cabbage and carrots in a food processor, coleslaw is quick to prepare. Serve it alongside BBQ, sandwiches, or fried fish.

Coleslaw

1 head green cabbage, cored and thinly shredded
2 carrots, peeled and shredded
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons vinegar
1/2 to 1 teaspoon celery seeds, to taste
salt and pepper, to taste

Combine the cabbage and shredded carrots in a large bowl. Combine the mayonnaise, sugar, vinegar, celery seeds, salt, and pepper together and pour over the slaw. Toss together and refrigerate the coleslaw until time to serve


Kimchi

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I’ve been taking Tae Kwon Do for about 6 months now.  My instructor’s sister brought the most amazing kimchi I have ever had to the Christmas party in December.  I have been thinking about it ever since. I have only had kimchi at Korean restaurants and was never really crazy about it. I decided to try making kimchi for myself. I looked at several kimchi recipes online and watched a couple of videos of it being prepared. I put together this recipe based on the recipes and techniques I saw. It turned out half way decent. Overall, my first attempt at kimchi was successful. I’m starting to understand how people become so addicted to this stuff.

I  have the used sriracha instead of the Korean red chile powder and I think it’s a good substitution in a pinch.

Kimchi

1 head Napa cabbage, cut into 2-inch chunks
6 cloves garlic
1 1-inch piece of ginger
1 medium diakon radish, peeled and cut into small dice (or grated)
1/2 bunch green onions, cut into 1-inch lengths
1/8 cup fish sauce
1/4 cup Korean red chile powder
1 teaspoon sugar
salt

Place the cut Napa cabbage in a large colander and sprinkle generously with salt, turning to coat. Let sit for about an hour. Add the diakon radish and sprinkle with salt again. Let sit another hour. Rinse vegetables with cold water and drain. Squeeze excess water from the cabbage and diakon mixture.

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Meanwhile, finely mince garlic and ginger in a food processor (or use a knife). In a large bowl, combine minced garlic and ginger, fish sauce, red chile powder, sugar, and green onions. Add the cabbage and diakon radish and mix well.

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Add the mixture to a large (1 quart) mason jar, pressing the ingredients down to remove air bubbles. You should be able to get most, if not all of the mixture into the jar. Screw on the lid. Let stand at room temperature for 1 or 2 or 3 days. When it starts to ferment, it will begin to bubble a bit. At that point it is ready to be eaten. Refrigerate after opening.

Kimchi keeps for awhile in the fridge. It will continue to ferment and will get increasingly sour. Some people like it that way. After about 4 weeks, it will be very sour. I prefer my kimchi to taste fresh and not sour, so I probably wouldn’t keep it longer than 4 weeks.


Bundgobhi Lobhiyewali (Cabbage with Black-Eyed Peas) & Masoor Masala (Spicy Lentils)

From September 28, 2004:  I made this incredibly delicious Indian meal last week.  I made bundgobhi lobhiyewali (cabbage and black-eyed peas) and masoor masala (spicy lentils).  I served these dishes with basmati rice, potato and green pea samosas ( I cheated and got some premade frozen samosas and fried them at home…. I do make my own most of the time, but they are time-consuming),  popadoms (fried Indian crackers imbedded with spices), and tamarind chutney (from a jar….Sashi Indian Magic brand).  Check out the recipes below.  

Bundgobhi Lobhiyewali (Cabbage with Black-Eyed Peas)

I liked this dish. The cabbage was sweet and its flavor melded well with the black-eyed peas. It was great reheated because the flavors had time to intensify, which is good because this recipe made a rather large batch.

Bundgobhi Lobhiyewali (Cabbage with Black-Eyed Peas)

1 medium cabbage, cored and thinly sliced
2 medium onions, sliced in thin half rounds
½ -inch piece fresh ginger, grated
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
salt, to taste
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
1 cup cooked black-eyed peas, drained (Iused 1 can)
½ teaspoon garam masala

In a large heavy-bottomed skillet over medium heat, warm the oil. add the cumin. When it darkens (1 to 2 seconds), add the grated ginger. Cook for 1 minute, then add the sliced onions and sauté until lightly browned (about 8 minutes). Add the cabbage, salt, cayenne, and turmeric. Stir, cover, reduce the heat to low, and cook until the cabbage is just done (about 20 minutes). Add the black-eyed peas, cover, and cook for another 5 minutes. Mix in the garam masala and serve.

Recipe source: From Bengal to Punjab: The Cuisines of India by Smita Chandra (The Crossing Press, 1991).

Masoor Masala (Spicy Lentils)

Masoor masala was the star of our Indian meal.  The addition of the spinach really made it incredible.  I’m assuming you could add other kinds of vegetables with good results….zucchini or cauliflower would probably be good additions to the lentils.  This dish is nutritious and incredibly inexpensive to prepare.  It is also awesome the next day because the flavors have had time to intensify. 

Masoor Masala (Spicy Lentils)

1 cup whole brown lentils
4 cups water
salt, to taste
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
2 medium onions, chopped finely
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
tiny pinch crushed asafetida (optional)
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon ground coriander seeds
¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 large tomato, chopped
5 to 10 ounces frozen chopped spinach (defrosted)

Wash the lentils, removing any broken pieces and debris. Place the lentils and the water in a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan, and let soak for 1 hour. Add the salt and turmeric, and cook covered over low heat until tender (about 30 minutes).

Meanwhile, in a small heavy-bottomed skillet over medium heat, warm the oil. Add the asafetida (if used) and cumin. when the spices darken (1 to 2 seconds), add the chopped onions and garlic and cook until browned (8 to 10 minutes). add the coriander, cayenne, and tomato; cook until the tomato is soft (about 5 minutes).

When the lentils are cooked, add the onion-tomato mixture and frozen spinach, stir, and cook for another 5 minutes (or until spinach is warm through).

Recipe adapted from: From Bengal toPunjab: The Cuisines of India by Smita Chandra (The Crossing Press, 1991).