Kimchi and Chicken Stew

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I like making Kimchi, but I usually make too much. Making a stew with the remaining Kimchi is a great way to ensure it doesn’t go to waste. I have made a Kimchi Stew using tofu, but I like this one made with chicken more. It’s even better the next day.

You will have to go to an Asian market (or Korean market) to find the Gochujang and Gochugaru. I’ve never seen these items in a regular grocery store. If you don’t want to make your own Kimchi, you can get it at the Asian market too. Get the fish sauce (I like Three Crabs brand) and the Chinese cooking wine there as well. These ingredients are essentials for many Korean or Asian recipes. Buy them and challenge yourself to use them.

Kimchi and Chicken Stew

5 dehydrated shiitake mushrooms
1 small onion, thinly slivered
1 tablespoon sesame oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
1-inch piece ginger, peeled and minced
2 cups your favorite kimchi
1 tablespoon Gochujang (Korean fermented hot pepper paste)
1 tablespoon Gochugaru (Korean red pepper flakes)
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese cooking wine
1 cup chicken broth
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cubed
salt and black pepper, to taste

Cooked rice, hot

Place the shiitake mushrooms in a bowl. Add enough hot water to cover. Soak until the mushrooms are soft, about 20 – 30 minutes. Remove the stems from the rehydrated mushrooms and slice thinly.

Heat the sesame oil over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened. Add the garlic and ginger and cook a couple more minutes, until fragrant.  Add the kimchi, Gochujang, Gochugaru, fish sauce, Chinese cooking wine, chicken broth, raw chicken, and the sliced rehydrated shiitake mushrooms. Raise the heat to medium-high and bring the stew to a slight boil. Cook until the chicken is cooked through, about 20 minutes. Taste, and season with salt and pepper if needed. Serve with hot rice.

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Kimchi Stew

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I made a batch of kimchi a few weeks ago. Kimchi continues to ferment and gets more sour with age.  I don’t like my kimchi overly sour, so I wanted to use what was left before it got too funky. Stews are very traditional Korean dishes and Kimchi Stew is very common. This Korean stew is super quick and a great way to use up left-over or older (more sour) batches of kimchi. It’s spicy, flavorful, and a great way to get your Korean food fix. Serve it with hot rice, if you wish.

This version of Kimchi Stew does not have the traditional pork belly in it. It is not vegetarian, though, because it does contains fish sauce. Of course, you can substitute soy sauce for the fish sauce. Just be aware that some kimchi is made with fish sauce, so if you want a truly vegetarian dish, you will have to buy a vegan version of kimchi or make your own.

You can buy kimchi at grocery stores, natural food markets, or Asian markets. It is usually in the produce section. It’s easy to make and you can find a recipe to make you own here.

Kimchi Stew

1 small onion, slivered
1 tablespoon sesame oil
3 cloves garlic, minced
1-inch piece of ginger, peeled, minced
1 1/2 cups kimchi, chopped into bite-sized pieces (include kimchi juices)
1 tablespoon gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste)
1 tablespoon gochugaru (Korean chile pepper powder)
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon Chinese cooking wine
6 ounces firm tofu, cubed (about 3/4 a package)
salt and pepper to taste
hot rice, to serve (optional)

Heat sesame oil over medium heat. Add sliced onion and saute until they just start to get tender. Add the garlic and ginger and continue to saute for a minute. Add the kimchi, gochujan, gochugaru, fish sauce, and Chinese cooking wine. Bring to a slight boil and cook 10 minutes. Stir in cubed tofu and heat through. Serve with hot rice, if desired.

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Kimchi

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I’ve been taking Tae Kwon Do for about 6 months now.  My instructor’s sister brought the most amazing kimchi I have ever had to the Christmas party in December.  I have been thinking about it ever since. I have only had kimchi at Korean restaurants and was never really crazy about it. I decided to try making kimchi for myself. I looked at several kimchi recipes online and watched a couple of videos of it being prepared. I put together this recipe based on the recipes and techniques I saw. It turned out half way decent. Overall, my first attempt at kimchi was successful. I’m starting to understand how people become so addicted to this stuff.

I  have the used sriracha instead of the Korean red chile powder and I think it’s a good substitution in a pinch.

Kimchi

1 head Napa cabbage, cut into 2-inch chunks
6 cloves garlic
1 1-inch piece of ginger
1 medium diakon radish, peeled and cut into small dice (or grated)
1/2 bunch green onions, cut into 1-inch lengths
1/8 cup fish sauce
1/4 cup Korean red chile powder
1 teaspoon sugar
salt

Place the cut Napa cabbage in a large colander and sprinkle generously with salt, turning to coat. Let sit for about an hour. Add the diakon radish and sprinkle with salt again. Let sit another hour. Rinse vegetables with cold water and drain. Squeeze excess water from the cabbage and diakon mixture.

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Meanwhile, finely mince garlic and ginger in a food processor (or use a knife). In a large bowl, combine minced garlic and ginger, fish sauce, red chile powder, sugar, and green onions. Add the cabbage and diakon radish and mix well.

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Add the mixture to a large (1 quart) mason jar, pressing the ingredients down to remove air bubbles. You should be able to get most, if not all of the mixture into the jar. Screw on the lid. Let stand at room temperature for 1 or 2 or 3 days. When it starts to ferment, it will begin to bubble a bit. At that point it is ready to be eaten. Refrigerate after opening.

Kimchi keeps for awhile in the fridge. It will continue to ferment and will get increasingly sour. Some people like it that way. After about 4 weeks, it will be very sour. I prefer my kimchi to taste fresh and not sour, so I probably wouldn’t keep it longer than 4 weeks.